Shangri-La at Glastonbury 2013

Earlier this month I headed off to Glastonbury to take some photos of the heaven and hell stages at Shangri-La, designed by long time client (and friend) Andrew T Cross from An-Architecture. I've worked with Andy on projects in the past and it's always good fun and a bit different to your usual shoot. When I turned up he showed me to the backstage camping area and then bought me a 2 litre bottle of cloudy cider before giving me a tour of the stages he'd designed and built on site.

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Berlin / Busman's Holiday / November 2012

At the end of November (after a manically busy month!), Fi and I took a short trip to Berlin. Purely accidentally, we ended up taking in a lot of great architecture, including David Chipperfield's Neues Museum, Mies Van Der Rohe's Nationalgalerie and Kino International. More images after "Read More"...

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Photowalk / December 2012

Every now and again, I meet up with a couple of good mates and head out on a photography safari. This time around Finn Hopson and I welcomed Andy Matthews down to Brighton for a wander along the coast.

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The Shingle House / Dungeness / February 2012

Two years ago the writer and philosopher, Alain de Botton set up Living Architecture. de Botton is the author of a number of books on subjects as diverse as love, travel and philosophy but it was after the publication of “The Architecture of Happiness” and the subsequent tours and talks he did, that he became convinced of a “desire to shift perceptions of modern architecture”.

From the Living Architecture website… “We wanted to allow people to experience what it is like to live, eat and sleep in a space designed by an outstanding architectural practice. While there are examples of great modern buildings in Britain, they tend to be in places that one passes through (eg. airports, museums, offices) and the few modern houses that exist are almost all in private hands and cannot be visited”

Living Architecture exists to give people the chance to holiday in exemplary examples of modern architecture, commissioning some of the finest architects in the world, in the hope the public might start to warm to the contemporary again.

Last month a group of us went to stay at NORD Architecture’s Living Architecture project in Dungeness; The Shingle House. NORD are a young Scottish practice with a great reputation for strong and striking buildings and this house is no different. I was asked to write a guest post for Collate’s blog on my stay there, where I go into lots of detail about the architecture and philosophy behind the home as well as what it was like to stay there. Rather than repeating that, I’ll just point you in it’s direction. You can read that post in full by clicking Two years ago the writer and philosopher, Alain de Botton set up Living Architecture. de Botton is the author of a number of books on subjects as diverse as love, travel and philosophy but it was after the publication of “The Architecture of Happiness” and the subsequent tours and talks he did, that he became convinced of a “desire to shift perceptions of modern architecture”.

From the Living Architecture website… “We wanted to allow people to experience what it is like to live, eat and sleep in a space designed by an outstanding architectural practice. While there are examples of great modern buildings in Britain, they tend to be in places that one passes through (eg. airports, museums, offices) and the few modern houses that exist are almost all in private hands and cannot be visited” Living Architecture exists to give people the chance to holiday in exemplary examples of modern architecture, commissioning some of the finest architects in the world, in the hope the public might start to warm to the contemporary again. Last month a group of us went to stay at NORD Architecture’s Living Architecture project in Dungeness; The Shingle House. NORD are a young Scottish practice with a great reputation for strong and striking buildings and this house is no different. I was asked to write a guest post for Collate’s blog on my stay there, where I go into lots of detail about the architecture and philosophy behind the home as well as what it was like to stay there. Rather than repeating that, I’ll just point you in it’s direction. You can read that post in full by clicking here.

In the meantime, here’s a load of pictures of the property (more after clicking "Read More")…

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Rowley Way / London / June 2011

Yesterday (Saturday, if you’re reading this on a Sunday), I went to the Alexandra and Ainsworth Estate in Camden, London with Paula Knee, Simon Kennedy and Aleks Krotoski. The estate, frequently called the Rowley Way estate, is about as good as it gets for me. Loads of concrete, utopian ideals, trees and plants, a community-minded spirit and designed by borough architects (Neave Brown of Camden Council’s Architects Department).

I appreciate I’m viewing this estate, and many others of the same era, with slightly rose-tinted glasses and without the knowledge gained from living there, so whilst photographing estates I always try to chat to some of the residents. Ron had been there for 25yrs and was kind enough to show me his home. Although he had some misgiving about the design and, in particular the way the services worked, he loves living there and praised the community spirit. He was proud of his home and to say he lived on the estate.

It was a lovely day, ended with a nice chat in a nearby cafe with my fellow photographers and a wander along the canal to Kings Cross in the sunshine, before joining a couple of mates for a few drinks back in Camden. Lovely stuff. Click "Read More" for more images…

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