Bloody Cameras / May 2012

Earlier this evening I made a comment on twitter about the disdain I have for cameras. This was a slightly off-the-cuff and glib comment that followed an even more off-the-cuff comment regarding new cameras being released, specifically the news that Leica have released the first ever black and white digital camera.

Upon reading the headline of the press release my instant response was “What’s the point of that?” I appreciate there’s certain advantages to removing all the processing a camera has to use to work in colour, and that this should make for richer mono images. It’ll be interesting to see what the final results are, but really I suspect it’ll be the kind of difference only the photographer and a couple of other folk might notice. “What’s the point of that?” probably speaks more about how I feel about cameras, than about new releases.

Anyway, the comment on my disdain for cameras was slightly tongue in cheek, but I would like to expand upon it a little, given more than 140 characters.

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Elly Ward / The Great Glass Divide / April 2012

A couple of months ago, Elly Ward got in touch with me on twitter as she had seen me tweeting about a stay at Living Architecture’s Shingle House in Dungeness. Elly was going to be the guest at the house immediately after us and I think she was just checking up to see what kind of state we were leaving it in. Elly is currently studying MA Architecture at the RCA alongside a friend of mine, Digory Macfarlane. Digs was part of the team that designed and built the Southbank Bandstand I shot last year. Small world!

Anyways, as part of her project this year, Elly has been working on an Illusion Booth – once she started telling me about it, I was dead interested and offered to take a few photos of it for her. First up, here’s Elly’s description of the project (click "Read More" for more images and info)…

‘The Great Glass Divide’

“This project was a 1:1 material test for an architectural programme of reflective and allegorical therapies at the propositional ‘Moral Rehabilitation Centre’."

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Bromley Portraits / Bromley / March 2012

I am an architectural photographer. I specialise in this area and 99% of my work is buildings. That said, like many photographers, I get asked to photograph all kinds of things on the basis I can work a camera pretty well. Weddings especially. I tend to pass these briefs onto other photographers best suited for the job, then I go back to photographing wonderful buildings that don’t blink on the shutter or complain that you got their double-chin in the image. That said, every now and again a proposal comes in that really interests me.

When Jenny and Bryony approached me with a project they were working on for their company, Hunter-Gatherers, I was caught by their brief for portraits of small business owners in Bromley in the environments they work in as they said they were looking for an architectural photographer to do the shoot. They were talking about creating a very structured, strong, architectural, environmental portrait style.

The images ended up being used in an exhibition to highlight Bromley’s independent shop scene (click "Read More" for more images)...

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The Shingle House / Dungeness / February 2012

Two years ago the writer and philosopher, Alain de Botton set up Living Architecture. de Botton is the author of a number of books on subjects as diverse as love, travel and philosophy but it was after the publication of “The Architecture of Happiness” and the subsequent tours and talks he did, that he became convinced of a “desire to shift perceptions of modern architecture”.

From the Living Architecture website… “We wanted to allow people to experience what it is like to live, eat and sleep in a space designed by an outstanding architectural practice. While there are examples of great modern buildings in Britain, they tend to be in places that one passes through (eg. airports, museums, offices) and the few modern houses that exist are almost all in private hands and cannot be visited”

Living Architecture exists to give people the chance to holiday in exemplary examples of modern architecture, commissioning some of the finest architects in the world, in the hope the public might start to warm to the contemporary again.

Last month a group of us went to stay at NORD Architecture’s Living Architecture project in Dungeness; The Shingle House. NORD are a young Scottish practice with a great reputation for strong and striking buildings and this house is no different. I was asked to write a guest post for Collate’s blog on my stay there, where I go into lots of detail about the architecture and philosophy behind the home as well as what it was like to stay there. Rather than repeating that, I’ll just point you in it’s direction. You can read that post in full by clicking Two years ago the writer and philosopher, Alain de Botton set up Living Architecture. de Botton is the author of a number of books on subjects as diverse as love, travel and philosophy but it was after the publication of “The Architecture of Happiness” and the subsequent tours and talks he did, that he became convinced of a “desire to shift perceptions of modern architecture”.

From the Living Architecture website… “We wanted to allow people to experience what it is like to live, eat and sleep in a space designed by an outstanding architectural practice. While there are examples of great modern buildings in Britain, they tend to be in places that one passes through (eg. airports, museums, offices) and the few modern houses that exist are almost all in private hands and cannot be visited” Living Architecture exists to give people the chance to holiday in exemplary examples of modern architecture, commissioning some of the finest architects in the world, in the hope the public might start to warm to the contemporary again. Last month a group of us went to stay at NORD Architecture’s Living Architecture project in Dungeness; The Shingle House. NORD are a young Scottish practice with a great reputation for strong and striking buildings and this house is no different. I was asked to write a guest post for Collate’s blog on my stay there, where I go into lots of detail about the architecture and philosophy behind the home as well as what it was like to stay there. Rather than repeating that, I’ll just point you in it’s direction. You can read that post in full by clicking here.

In the meantime, here’s a load of pictures of the property (more after clicking "Read More")…

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Conran at the Design Museum / London / February 2012

Last week, Conran & Partners commissioned me to head over to the Design Museum to document the exhibition they have on at the moment marking the life and work of Terence Conran. From the Design Museum’s website… “The Design Museum marks Sir Terence Conran’s 80th birthday with a major exhibition that explores his unique impact on contemporary life in Britain. Through his own design work, and also through his entrepreneurial flair, Conran has transformed the British way of life. The Way We Live Now explores Conran’s impact and legacy, whilst also showing his design approach and inspirations. The exhibition traces his career from post-war austerity through to the new sensibility of the Festival of Britain in the 1950s, the birth of the Independent Group and the Pop Culture of the 1960s, to the design boom of the 1980s and on to the present day”

More pictures after clicking "Read More"...

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